Posted tagged ‘photography’

Oh, the Leaves

October 11, 2022

P1000605With October here in Utah have come shorter days and cooler evenings, two of nature’s signals to deciduous trees to start shutting down for winter.   Accordiing to ZME Science, the chlorophyll in their leaves, which gave the leaves their green color, begins to break down, revealing other pigments that were hidden during the summer.  Leaves also contain the pigments called carotenoids; xanthophylls are yellow (such as in corn) and carotenes are orange (like in carrots).  Sugars stored within the leaves break down, producing bright red anthocyanins (which also help protect the tree while the leaves are fading).   The tree begins do build a protective layer between the leaves and its branches that eventually cause the leaves to fall off.  Even from our front porch we can see the foliage on the Wasach Mountain changing colors.  Oh, the leaves, you, hear people saying, and Oh, Fall is my favorite seasonIt’s not contest, cautions my favorite comedian, Jim Gaffigan, scolding us tongue-in-cheek for getting so much pleasure out of watching the leaves die (watch here). (more…)

Sudden Beauty

August 9, 2022

PSX_20220808_081837Don’t you love it when you are going through the motions of a mundane day, uninspired and mindless, when suddenly something soul stirring appears right in front of you and (to borrow a saying from my youth) blows your sensory doors in?  It could be a herd of antelope in our meadow or the setting sun illuminating the mountains.   It is what some of my friends call God showing off … other say Nature in all its glory.   Here on Oldereyes – Bud’s Blog, it doesn’t matter which you choose, as long as you take time to notice.  And let it move you.  Some years ago, I became an avid photographer when I found out that keeping a camera close by keeps me noticing the world around me.   Yes, I know, every phone has a camera, but a real camera is better no matter what Apple tries to tell you.

This week as I turned onto Lake Avenue headed toward Mountain View Parkway, the sky was filled with clouds tinted gold by the late afternoon sun.   The sky was a crisp blue and seemed to go on forever.  I reached for my camera and … gloom …I’d left it at home.  But yes, I had my phone.   I pulled to the side of the road and began snapping (well, I know, phone cameras don’t really snap but that’s how 78 year olds talk).  And here’s what I got.

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Nature in all its glory.   God showing off.  Amen.

Snow

January 9, 2021

I grew up in New England, Connecticut to be precise.  When I was a child, snow was a delight, a chance to sled, have snowball fights, build snow forts and snowmen.   As I grew, it became a source of income as well as fun … there were usually neighbors willing to pay a few dollars to have their driveways shoveled.   The Christmas light reflected in the glittering snow are part of my best holiday memories.  It even played a role in the courtship of my wife, Muri.  We made up after our last break-up standing on the bridge on the University of Connecticut’s Mirror Lake.  During a snow storm.  Apparently that’s a good place to make a commitment because here we are, 54 years later. (more…)

Kestrals

November 1, 2020

kestral12If you drive around our new neighborhood in Daybreak, Utah, you will notice numerous streets named for the robin-sized hawk known as the American Kestral. As a bird-lover, I was anxious to see one by it took a while since: from a distance, they look like any other medium sized bird; they are fairly shy (especially camera shy, more about that in a bit); and their population is in decline as the human population grows. I eventually became adept at spotting them, usually perched on the top of a lamp post or the uppermost branches of a small tree. Having spotted them, I naturally wanted to get a good photograph. (more…)

The Art of Napping

March 2, 2019

Orange-tabby-cat-sleeping-with-eyes-closedIf you have ever owned a cat (or more correctly, if a cat has ever owned you), you know that cats sleep a lot.  According to catster.com, cats can sleep up to 16 hours a day, more as they get older (I can relate).   As a somewhat fitful napper, I am always jealous of how my cats have seemed to be able to nap comfortably almost anywhere … and appear blissfully at ease in the most interesting positions.   Yes, there’s stretching, too, but we’ll leave that for another day.  However, my newest feline companion, Claude, between his Rorschach-Test markings and the variation of positions he assumes in his beds, raises napping to the level of art.   Here is a collage of just a few of his abstract patterns.

Art of the Nap (more…)

Small Things

October 22, 2018

I’m sure I’ve said this here before.   I’m pretty sure I’ll say it again.  The reason I carry my camera when I walk in the park is that it takes my focus away from what’s going on inside my head and into the world around me.   Some days, there are red-shouldered hawks, trees in bloom and sunsets over the lake to grab my attention.  Other days, like today, Small Things catch my eye if (and only if) I am mindful … petals on the ground against fallen leaves …

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… seed pods hanging from a bright green tree … (more…)

De Haze, De Haze

August 18, 2018

P1040456We are currently on a vacation in the Canadian Rockies celebrating the 50th wedding anniversary of Mrs. Eyes and I.    Flying into Calgary last Tuesday, the pilot on our Alaska Airlines flight announced that visibility at the airport was very poor due to the dozens of fires burning in British Columbia.  That was the first thought I’d given to concerns that the smoke might interfere with the incredible views we hoped to see around Banff and Canmore.   Our concerns were confirmed as we pulled into our hotel, the Blackstone Lodge.  The towering mountains visible from our room were vague silhouettes against the gray, smoke-filled sky.   By Thursday, when we took our first tour of the Banff area, the haze had lifted some but my photographs were hardly what I’d hoped for, color faded toward gray by the smoke in the air.   It is interesting how the human eye can perceive the beauty of a scene but the camera can only capture what it sees. (more…)

Artsy

November 21, 2017

cocktail-party-_2502341b-11247034466.jpgSuppose you are at a party.   Trying to make small talk, you strike up a conversation with someone you don’t know.  Sooner or later, you are likely to ask the ubiquitous question, What do you do?  If the person replies, I’m a doctor … or even better, I’m a neurosurgeon … you are likely impressed, as well as encouraged that a path for an interesting conversation lies ahead.   If your new acquaintance says, I’m an engineer, not so much on either account.   But what if the answer is, I’m an artist?  How do respond?  With interest or skepticism?  Do you subtly check her out to see if she looks like an artist?  Are you intimidated?  Do you silently wonder, Do you have a real job?  If instead of introducing himself as an artist, your new friend says, I’m a painter, do you automatically assume he paints houses?  Or, if she says she’s a writer, do you ask, Have written any books?  Which means, for sure, Have you published any books?  Do you mumble, I don’t now anything about art, and escape to talk to someone else.  Or do you say, I used to like art but I wasn’t very good at it?  Or, recall that when you began to dabble in drawing, your parents cautioned, You can’t make a living as an artist, you know. (more…)

Photo Tuesday

October 13, 2015

In keeping with my commitment to start blogging again, I’m going to try posting a photograph each Tuesday.   If you’ve been coming around for a while, you know that Older Eyes spends a lot of time at the park and he has his best walks with camera in hand, reminding him to be mindful.  No, it’s not a National Park or a wilderness park, and the wildlife I see on my walks rarely even draws a glance from the (mostly) dog-walkers, which is a shame.   Because there is wonder in the details of the most common creature, like this Snowy Egret I caught waiting for a meal to swim by in one of the park’s lakes.

egret

Did you know that the species was slaughtered for its plumes in the 19th century, but protection brought a rapid recovery of numbers, and the Snowy Egret is now more widespread and common than ever.  Widespread and common, but still beautiful.

Seasonal Confusion

January 11, 2015

winter mtnsWhen my wife, Muri, and I moved to Southern California over forty years ago from New England, we laughed at people bundled up in winter jackets and gloves for what passed as cold weather here. Yesterday, as I tried to get in my walk in the park before the winter showers turned to rain, I looked like a native Californian … no gloves, but a jacket and warm beanie to cope with the frigid mid-fifties temperature. Just a few days ago, it was eighty degrees in the daytime and a few days before, it was in the high thirties at night. There was frost on the front lawn and the roof next door. (more…)